Marion Fay

Marion Fay The novel contrasts two love affairs each involving an aristocrat and a commoner The subversive Lord Hampstead s plunge into middle class society in his passionate pursuit of Marion Fay a Quaker and

  • Title: Marion Fay
  • Author: Anthony Trollope
  • ISBN: 9780140438482
  • Page: 484
  • Format: Paperback
  • The novel contrasts two love affairs, each involving an aristocrat and a commoner The subversive Lord Hampstead s plunge into middle class society in his passionate pursuit of Marion Fay, a Quaker and daughter of a City clerk, is balanced by the testing of his radical friend George Roden, a clerk in the General Post Office, whose bizarre experiences among the aristocracyThe novel contrasts two love affairs, each involving an aristocrat and a commoner The subversive Lord Hampstead s plunge into middle class society in his passionate pursuit of Marion Fay, a Quaker and daughter of a City clerk, is balanced by the testing of his radical friend George Roden, a clerk in the General Post Office, whose bizarre experiences among the aristocracy during his courtship of Hampstead s sister Lady Frances Trafford, are employed to satirize the concept of rank Trollope vividly evokes the dull working lives, plain homes, blank streets, and limited horizons of the dwellers in Paradise Row,using them as an ironic choric commentary on the unattainable world of rank, wealth and freedom, symbolized by life in the great country houses.

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      Published :2019-08-20T00:48:31+00:00

    About "Anthony Trollope"

    1. Anthony Trollope

      Anthony Trollope became one of the most successful, prolific and respected English novelists of the Victorian era Some of Trollope s best loved works, known as the Chronicles of Barsetshire, revolve around the imaginary county of Barsetshire he also wrote penetrating novels on political, social, and gender issues and conflicts of his day.Trollope has always been a popular novelist Noted fans have included Sir Alec Guinness who never travelled without a Trollope novel , former British Prime Ministers Harold Macmillan and Sir John Major, economist John Kenneth Galbraith, American novelists Sue Grafton and Dominick Dunne and soap opera writer Harding Lemay Trollope s literary reputation dipped somewhat during the last years of his life, but he regained the esteem of critics by the mid twentieth century.See also enpedia wiki Anthony_

    905 thoughts on “Marion Fay”

    1. The book description attached to this edition is about as perfect a description of this novel as could be written. It does indeed involve two love affairs - romance would be a better term - each between a noble and a commoner and treats the subject with as much humor as one can expect from Trollope. He's often amusing with the occasional paragraph that elicits a good loud guffaw. I admit that I spent a few moments looking at the definition of the word "burlesque" because in my mind the connotati [...]


    2. Not one of Trollope's better known books, but I enjoyed it and there is more to it than meets the eye. It deals in part with consumption (we can forget it was incurable at the time and it's effect has been compared to the AIDS epidemic). It also deals with love and marraige between classes and here Trollope does push the boundaries. Class is important in English history and Trollope toys with class sensibilities. It deals with radicalism in the upper classes and conservatism in the lower middle [...]


    3. In the nineteen nineties I read about twenty-five Trollope novels. After about a decade of reading, I was satisfied. Since then I have I picked up a Trollope novel every year or two. (Fortunately, there are many still waiting for me to read, and as a rule their quality is high) Now I have just finished reading _Marion Fay_, one of the later novels, which I found to be a total delight. I think you might call it a "romance," since it has some modestly fanciful elements, namely a post office clerk [...]


    4. I love most of the Trollope I have read, in varying degrees. I took this particular book with me on holiday because it was long and I thought it would last me through at least one trans-Atlantic crossing, which it did. One of the things I frequently enjoy in Trollope is when he sets up a scenario that will be difficult to resolve, makes me fear the worst will happen, and then resolves it in a satisfactory way. I had great hopes of this situation: there were two couples facing obstacles to marria [...]



    5. Lady Frances Trafford has become engaged to a post office clerk called George Roden. Her brother, Lord Hampstead, falls in love with Marion Fay, the daughter of a Quaker. Their step-mother, Lady Kingsbury considers both proposed marriages to be unacceptable, as they would be "marrying down" the social classes. Lord Kingsbury was a Radical in his youth, but has become more conservative with age and the influence of his wife.I enjoyed a chunk in the middle of this book very much, but the beginning [...]


    6. The Marquis of Kingsbury has two children, now adults, Hampstead and Frances. He brought them up with liberal notions, but now that their mother has died and he has remarried, he has returned to the political conservatism befitting his station in life. But, alas, those liberal notions have taken hold in his children, and Frances seeks to marry a clerk in the post office, while Hampstead courts a Quaker, the Marion Fay of the title.This is of course familiar Trollope territory -- children seeking [...]


    7. Having focussed on 19th-century British literature as an English major in college, it's surprising I'd never read any Trollope before now. This is a fairly typical account of the class system in England at the time, but "typical" does not mean uninteresting. The twist is that two aristocrats--brother and sister--fall for "commoners." This gives us the added view of not only the gulf between the classes but also the gulf between the genders. While people are aghast that the sister wants to marry [...]


    8. Although she is the title character Marion Fay does not appear in this book until Chapter 8, which does leave the reader a little puzzled while all the other characters are introduced. When I did finally meet the eponymous heroine she was most definitely not my favourite character and her arguments with Lord Hampstead were the most tedious part of the novel. However, there are several other excellent characters and overall the story is enjoyable. In conclusion, not Trollope's best work but still [...]


    9. This was, to quote Henry James on another Trollope novel, a thoroughly stupid novel; there is not one thing in it that is not stupid. I guess if you are that prolific, sometimes you have a few misses. I did make it all the way through, because he does know how to tell a story, but it's a stupid, stupid story, featuring a postal clerk who turns out to be an Italian Duke, a consumptive Quaker heroine, a murderous but pusillanimous clergyman, a vindictive Countess and a great deal of misplaced quot [...]


    10. Lowest rating I've given to Trollope, one of my very favourite authors. The main plot is implausible and not awfully nice either, but the book is redeemed by the gloriously vulgar and irrepressible Crocker, and the villainous Greenwood. If this was the first Trollope I'd read, I probably wouldn't have bothered with another.


    11. Sweet and romantic. I like Trollope for the real time flavor of his writing.Merged review:I love Trollope as I like the real time sense of history and how differently relationship issues were. Sweet and romantic.


    12. A rather silly Trolllope novel with love between classes, long drawn out impossible romances, romantic death. My favorite character was Mr Greenwood, a lazy plump clergyman who always seemed to know how to look out for himself.


    13. I agree with the reviewer that said this has more to it than meets the eye. It would've worked well in a multi-volume series. It didn't quite work here.



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