Forget a Mentor, Find a Sponsor: The New Way to Fast-Track Your Career

Forget a Mentor Find a Sponsor The New Way to Fast Track Your Career Who s pulling for you Who s got your back Who s putting your hat in the ring Odds are this person is not a mentor but a sponsor Mentors can build your self esteem and provide a sounding board but they

  • Title: Forget a Mentor, Find a Sponsor: The New Way to Fast-Track Your Career
  • Author: Sylvia Ann Hewlett
  • ISBN: 9781422187166
  • Page: 467
  • Format: Paperback
  • Who s pulling for you Who s got your back Who s putting your hat in the ring Odds are this person is not a mentor but a sponsor Mentors can build your self esteem and provide a sounding board but they re not your ticket to the top.If you re interested in fast tracking your career, what you need is a sponsor a senior level champion who believes in your potential and isWho s pulling for you Who s got your back Who s putting your hat in the ring Odds are this person is not a mentor but a sponsor Mentors can build your self esteem and provide a sounding board but they re not your ticket to the top.If you re interested in fast tracking your career, what you need is a sponsor a senior level champion who believes in your potential and is willing to advocate for you as you pursue that next raise or promotion.In this powerful yet practical book, economist and thought leader Sylvia Ann Hewlett author of ten critically acclaimed books, including the groundbreaking Off Ramps and On Ramps shows why sponsors are your proven link to success Mixing solid data with vivid real life narratives, Hewlett reveals the two way street that makes sponsorship such a strong and mutually beneficial alliance The seven step map at the heart of this book allows you to chart your course toward your greatest goals.Whether you re looking to lead a company or drive a community campaign, Forget a Mentor, Find a Sponsor will help you forge the relationships that truly have the power to deliver you to your destination.

    • Unlimited [Paranormal Book] ✓ Forget a Mentor, Find a Sponsor: The New Way to Fast-Track Your Career - by Sylvia Ann Hewlett ✓
      467 Sylvia Ann Hewlett
    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [Paranormal Book] ✓ Forget a Mentor, Find a Sponsor: The New Way to Fast-Track Your Career - by Sylvia Ann Hewlett ✓
      Posted by:Sylvia Ann Hewlett
      Published :2019-04-17T12:59:56+00:00

    About "Sylvia Ann Hewlett"

    1. Sylvia Ann Hewlett

      Sylvia Ann Hewlett Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Forget a Mentor, Find a Sponsor: The New Way to Fast-Track Your Career book, this is one of the most wanted Sylvia Ann Hewlett author readers around the world.

    843 thoughts on “Forget a Mentor, Find a Sponsor: The New Way to Fast-Track Your Career”

    1. This book goes against every fundamental belief I have for what it means to be a good employee. To paraphrase, Hewlett states that it's more important to be a "loyal protege" than be productive. The secret to being a leader with vitality is also, apparently, having "toned arms."Frankly, I've gotten much better advice from my mentors.


    2. I like the distinction between mentor and sponsor - but that's about all I liked about the book. I got the audiobook for free and it was short at least.


    3. Depending on how you view your career this book may be very helpful. If you are very motivated by money then you should absolutely read this book, but if you are not then I'm not sure how helpful it will be. Also, the title is definitely misleading throughout the book the author clearly indicates you need a mentor to navigate political climate, unwritten rules, and mature as a professional. Where a mentor might not be as helpful is upward mobility and he/she may not have the social capital for t [...]


    4. It's not mind-blowing or exceptionally genius but it does provide some insights that may help. Everyone is bound to make mistakes and it would hurt you more if you have no idea you are making them (and thus keep repeating them). Navigating the social waters at work is hard, especially if you are not Caucasian and male, so i do think this book will add something. On top of that, the main point is about finding sponsors and not mentors. The terms are differentiated: Sponsors are those who will sti [...]


    5. Find a Sponsor - Who’s pulling for you? Who’s got your back? Who’s putting your hat in the ring? Odds are this person is not a mentor but a sponsor. Mentors can build your self-esteem and provide a sounding board—but they’re not your ticket to the top. If you’re interested in fast-tracking your career, what you need is a sponsor—a senior-level champion who believes in your potential and is willing to advocate for you as you pursue that next raise or promotion. This a mutually benef [...]


    6. 4.5 stars. I rounded up. Definitely worth the read and very important for women, in particular to understand the difference between a mentor and a sponsor and why you need both to advance your career.


    7. Very good review of the difference between mentoring as we understand it and sponsoring, and the clear advocacy to have both. The examples of sponsorship (or lack of) consequences are very adequate and enlightening. I also like the fact that it lists the expectations from a mentee.


    8. Very similar to her boo Executive Presence. Same stories and ideas. I preferred this book over EP. It seemed fresher. While mentors are valuable, I've had a few myself, I see the reason finding a sponsor has greater impact in one's career. Overall a good read.


    9. This book definitely makes me much more aware of the distinction between a mentor and a sponsor: a mentor is someone that you really like and someone you go to for advice, but they don't necessarily have the clout to make things happen for you. A sponsor is someone that you don't necessarily need to feel a personal connection to - just someone hugely influential in your chosen field. You do a great job in your sponsors' tasks for you, and your sponsor advocates for you to make sure that you get [...]


    10. This book is a fabulous resource – I really wish I’d read it a couple years ago, though it’s definitely applicable to me now in my career. I was given this book as part of being accepted into a Sponsorship program at my work and I found it extremely helpful, approachable, and a resource I will look to in the future as well as put to use now. I really identified with a lot of the examples she provides of what not to do in your career (if you want to advance quickly). Like one of her case st [...]


    11. This is an interesting and practical book that provides a real strategy for forging a way through the challenges in your career. We've all heard about the importance of mentors, and they play an important role in anyone's development. However, most mentors don't have the influence to propel you forward when what is required is more than 'just' confidence and skills. The sponsor is someone who can give you the opportunity itself. This book gives interesting real-world examples of mostly women and [...]


    12. Every single women should read this book. Especially if she works in a male dominated field. First, let’s start with some definitions.Mentor is somebody who gives you advice or is a shoulder to cry on. A sponsor is someone in a position where he or she can advance your career in exchange for your loyalty and results. It is a two-way street. It might be a quid pro quid relationship. And that is fine, because you are in that position in the first place because of your hard work and results.This [...]


    13. A first note: I didn't select this book; I was assigned to read this book as part of a sponsorship program at my company. It felt somewhat padded (it would have been fine as a long New Yorker article or a Kindle single) but made some important points that it took me years to realize in my career -- that promotions don't (only) come from putting your nose to the grindstone and doing good work but from managing your relationships with people in power. While I've come to know that, this book did pu [...]


    14. This is my first review. This also my first book giveaway win. Yay! On to reviewing. Dr. Hewlett, I both enjoyed and appreciated, but felt forgotten in, the advice provided by this book. It was a very quick, concise, and thoughtful read. I can use much within these pages.However, as a Black woman, the advice left me very much needing to choose which minority status to align with. As a Gen Y, I felt much of the advice was geared to my age who are somewhat established, but left out those, to a cer [...]


    15. As soon as I finish this review, I'm literally going to open up my corporate Outlook and set up some time on the calendar of a possible sponsor. I've read over 100 business books this year alone for tips on how to be more successful, and I can honestly say that this one has taken about the best 95% of the advice and put it in one place.My only issue is that there's no mention on the cover that this book will hugely focus on women, minorities, and LGBT needs. That's fine, and pertains to me, and [...]


    16. Sometime in the last couple of years, this became required reading for women in higher education - you can't read anything about professional development without it coming up in conversation. My all-women office read it for our June book club pick and while we had great discussion about the topics, my overall reaction is that it was good but not THAT great. It's probably a 3.5 for me, so I rounded up to 4 stars.It's well-researched and a quick, easy read, but I couldn't help but think that I've [...]


    17. A quick and useful read.Hewlett gives a clear definition of who and what are sponsors, and how do they differ from the traditional mentors.One quote I'll remember is "How many people do you have in your pocket?", i.e. how many people can you depend upon to come to your assistance when needed. Whether it is to take on a difficult project you have to delegate, or to give you a promotion/job, having deep pockets through sponsorship will ensure that at every step of the way, you'd have well cultivat [...]


    18. I'm woefully adding this to my book challenge list (only because I'm now in school and have paused reading for leisure). Can affirmatively say that I would not have read it if it weren't assigned - primarily because I'm skeptical of the 'self help' genre. Although, I could have gone my entire life and not read this, as I found the tone condescending, narrow-sighted, and coldly technical in its attempt to promote building relationships in the name of sponsorship.


    19. The mentor is the therapist personality who can sit and have coffee with you. The sponsor is someone who can make one phone call and get you a job. This book is full of case studies about people who have faced situations on the job where they either advanced or failed to advance due to their connection or lack thereof to someone who was more politically powerful and connected, and also (down the road) due to whether they were able to maintain and reciprocate that relationship.



    20. Should be a must-read for every young personThe author gives a seven point plan to succeed and every word is brilliant. There's nothing about being lazy in here. It will require hard work and dedication. As I read it, I cringed over the many mistakes I'd made over time. I wish I had this book when I was first starting out. It's a game changer.


    21. Mentors aren't enough, argues Hewlett, you need a sponsor -- that is, a boss who will go out on limb to give you a meaty assignment; who will champion you when its time for a promotion or pay raise; and will give you the cover needed to take risks.


    22. Even though I'm not the target audience for this book, I found it informative, useful and (in some cases) eye-opening. Hopefully I can apply what I learned to my own career as well as those I might be able to influence.


    23. One hundred yes's to this book. I personally found an amazingly fresh perspective in this book. I think its an important an inspiring work that every woman should read. A great resource I know I will return to again and again.


    24. Solid perspective on career growth and development. The author gives some honest insight and actionable tips on how to develop and maintain sponsors. The book was focused on women more so than I expected but does reference minorities and the advice is mostly universal.



    25. Read this for work. The message was good, but it could have been summed up in one sentence. Narration for the audio book is attrocious.


    26. Practical advice for all careerists. If you think hard work is enough, you're wrong. A must-read for anyone looking to make a difference in any organization.


    27. Helps the reader understand why women and minorities have a difficult time "getting in the game" despite having stellar qualifications.



    Leave a Comment

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *