Paris Was a Woman: Portraits from the Left Bank

Paris Was a Woman Portraits from the Left Bank Originally published than twenty years ago and winner of a Lambda Literary Award Paris Was a Woman is a rare profile of the female literati in Paris at the turn of the century Now with a new preface

  • Title: Paris Was a Woman: Portraits from the Left Bank
  • Author: Andrea Weiss
  • ISBN: 9781619021792
  • Page: 298
  • Format: Paperback
  • Originally published than twenty years ago and winner of a Lambda Literary Award, Paris Was a Woman is a rare profile of the female literati in Paris at the turn of the century Now with a new preface and illustrations, this scrapbook of their work along with Andrea Weiss lively commentary highlights the political, social, and artistic lives of the renowned lesbianOriginally published than twenty years ago and winner of a Lambda Literary Award, Paris Was a Woman is a rare profile of the female literati in Paris at the turn of the century Now with a new preface and illustrations, this scrapbook of their work along with Andrea Weiss lively commentary highlights the political, social, and artistic lives of the renowned lesbian and bisexual Modernists, including Colette, Djuna Barnes, Gertrude Stein, Alice B Toklas, Sylvia Beach, and many .Painstakingly researched and profusely illustrated, it is an enlightening account of women who between wars found their selves and their voices in Paris A wealth of photographs, paintings, drawings, and literary fragments combine with Weiss revealing text to give an unparalleled insight into this extraordinary network of women for who Paris was neither mistress nor muse, but a different kind of woman.

    • Best Read [Andrea Weiss] æ Paris Was a Woman: Portraits from the Left Bank || [Business Book] PDF ☆
      298 Andrea Weiss
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Andrea Weiss] æ Paris Was a Woman: Portraits from the Left Bank || [Business Book] PDF ☆
      Posted by:Andrea Weiss
      Published :2019-07-26T20:56:22+00:00

    About "Andrea Weiss"

    1. Andrea Weiss

      Andrea Weiss is an internationally acclaimed documentary filmmaker and nonfiction author Her books include Paris Was A Woman Harper Collins, 1995 , Vampires And Violets Penguin, 1993 , and, most recently, In The Shadow Of The Magic Mountain The Erika And Klaus Mann Story University of Chicago Press, 2008 They have been translated into French, German, Korean, Swedish, Japanese, and Croatian Source andreaweiss bio

    908 thoughts on “Paris Was a Woman: Portraits from the Left Bank”

    1. The best volume I've found to get the feel of the importance of the women to the time. Without each other's support, both emotionally & financially, the arts really would have suffered. We wouldn't have had a Shakespeare&Co Joyce's works may have gone begging, Stein's productivity would certainly have been diminished, even Genet may never have come into existence. I found this a good read, peppered through with great photos, a few of which I had never seen before.


    2. Fantastic how much you learn about the Lost Generation, especially the women from the Left Bank. Historical background, little anecdotes and the feeling of that time. These women moved in all the important circles of literature and art. It's interesting to see how they helped and encouraged each other, how they formed a community to exchange ideas, how committed they were and how they influenced the people around them. Among them Djuna Barnes, Sylvia Beach, Colette, Thelma Wood and Gertrude Stei [...]


    3. I received a free copy of this book through a giveaway. An absolutely excellent book, either for those who know something about the period or nothing at all. This portrait of life amongst the female intellectuals is brilliantly researched, but equally Weiss's own interpretations and opinions are just as insightful and well presented. The illustrations are well chosen and printed making it a highly enjoyable visual experience. It is both uplifting and heartbreaking to learn about the amazing wor [...]


    4. Since I am enamored with this literary period/history and love most of the writers featured in this book I more or less used it as a kind of reference book in order to research further female authors such as Gertrude, Colette, Anais etc. while reading Silvia Beach and the Lost Generation. Read it 20 years ago but still pick it up from time to time to remember how much I love all of these writers!



    5. Books about the “left bank” in Paris in the early twentieth century usually talk about the “lost generation” of (mainly male) writers, artists, musicians, etc. The last people you are likely to hear about are the many talented women who managed to escape the boredom of bourgeois married life and find a way to express their energy and creativity in Paris, alongside the men – though often in very different ways.These women included the remarkable Sylvia Beach, who ran the famous bookstor [...]


    6. I only realised this was "a book" after watching the end credits on TV of the enthralling documentary based on "the book".I soon had the enthralling book (in September 1998)t surprisinglybut little realising that I would soon be trawling the very same streets in May 1999 to locate the addresses of many old favourites eg. Colette, Gertrude Stein & Alice B. Toklas, Natalie Barney; or some like Janet Flanner, whose articles I'd enjoyed without discovering the wonderful personality behind them; [...]


    7. This was given to me for Xmas, which was very exciting, as it is out of print! I would give this Five Stars for the photographs, which are truly stellar and Three Stars for the writing, which is so plodding and boring, compared to the wildly dynamic characters the author is writing about! It's quite an academic book and while many of the facts were interesting, I was much more emotionally moved by the images and copies of letters included in this book. If you are a fan of the women of this time [...]


    8. A somewhat dry and plodding account of a fascinating moment in literary history and in the Modernist movement - a more or less chronological group portrait of the mostly expatriate, mostly queer women who lived in Paris between the wars and shaped the Modernist movement. These include Sylvia Beach and Adrienne Monnier, Colette, Gertrude Stein and Alice Toklas, Nathalie Barney and Romaine Brooks, HD and Bryher, Janet Flanner and Solita Solano, Djuna Barnes, Thelma Wood and Mina Loy. Their stories [...]


    9. Engl. title: Paris was a WomanThe photos and text excerpts in this book were great. What I would have wished for was some more in-depth information of what was new and exciting about the modernist movement and a bit less of the gossipy stuff about the lesbian relationships. Apart from their love stories and open-mindedness about modernism, I wanted to know about the ideas that inspired these women who lived on the left bank of the Seine in Paris between the wars (among them Djuna Barnes, Gertrud [...]


    10. This was such a pleasure to read, but then, this is a time, place, and set of characters that I have some familiarity with. I don't know how it would be to read this if you didn't know something already of the cultural and political history of Paris in the early 20th century. For me, reading this book was a treat: almost like a stroll through the city, stopping at landmarks and reminiscing, or perhaps sitting down with beloved friends and turning the pages of a scrapbook, lingering over a favori [...]


    11. Very enjoyable portraits of the extraordinary group of women artists, writers and their support group in early twentieth century Paris. Not only did the "history light" vignettes give us an idea of the women's lives and relationships, the many pictures were also a great record of the time. I was already a fan of Sylvia and Gertrude and who wouldn't fall under the hypnotic spell of the , but Janet Flanner is a new found favourite.


    12. I didn't care as much for this book as I thought I would. These women led some fairly exciting and unconventional lives during the first half of the twentieth century, and I admired them for that. However, the book was a bit "listy" and did not hold my attention.


    13. This book is great. Lots of wonderful photos of all of the interesting people who populated Paris in the 20's. There is a documentary (based on this book, not the reverse I think) that is really great. It is also called Paris Was a Woman.



    14. A look at the women in Paris of the early 1900s, including Gertrude Stein, Djuna Barnes, Colette, painters, photographers, booksellers, poets and editors. Very interesting.


    15. Very interesting review of the social system in the women's artists' circle in Paris around 1930.


    16. Essential reading for anyone interested in the history of the world's greatest city. Well-written and concise.




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