The Tooth Fairy: Parents, Lovers, and Other Wayward Deities (A Memoir)

The Tooth Fairy Parents Lovers and Other Wayward Deities A Memoir In shimmering prose that weaves among intimate confessions deadpan asides and piercing observations on the fear and turmoil that defined the long decade after Clifford Chase tells the stories

  • Title: The Tooth Fairy: Parents, Lovers, and Other Wayward Deities (A Memoir)
  • Author: Clifford Chase
  • ISBN: 9781468306958
  • Page: 153
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In shimmering prose that weaves among intimate confessions, deadpan asides, and piercing observations on the fear and turmoil that defined the long decade after 9 11, Clifford Chase tells the stories that have shaped his adulthood There are his aging parents, whose disagreements sharpen as their health declines and his beloved brother, lost tragically to AIDS and his lIn shimmering prose that weaves among intimate confessions, deadpan asides, and piercing observations on the fear and turmoil that defined the long decade after 9 11, Clifford Chase tells the stories that have shaped his adulthood There are his aging parents, whose disagreements sharpen as their health declines and his beloved brother, lost tragically to AIDS and his long term boyfriend always present, but always kept at a distance There is also the revelatory, joyful music of the B 52s, Chase s sexual confusion in his twenties, and recently, the mysterious appearance in his luggage of weird objects from Iran the year his mother died In the midst of all this is Chase s singular voice incisive, wry, confiding, by turns cool or emotional, always engaging The way this book is written in pitch perfect fragments is crucial to Chase s deeper message that we experience and remember in short bursts of insight, terror, comedy, and love As ambitious in its form as it is in its radical candor, The Tooth Fairy is the rare memoir that can truly claim to rethink the genre.

    • Unlimited [Chick Lit Book] Ë The Tooth Fairy: Parents, Lovers, and Other Wayward Deities (A Memoir) - by Clifford Chase ↠
      153 Clifford Chase
    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [Chick Lit Book] Ë The Tooth Fairy: Parents, Lovers, and Other Wayward Deities (A Memoir) - by Clifford Chase ↠
      Posted by:Clifford Chase
      Published :2019-08-23T02:04:49+00:00

    About "Clifford Chase"

    1. Clifford Chase

      Clifford Chase Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Tooth Fairy: Parents, Lovers, and Other Wayward Deities (A Memoir) book, this is one of the most wanted Clifford Chase author readers around the world.

    991 thoughts on “The Tooth Fairy: Parents, Lovers, and Other Wayward Deities (A Memoir)”

    1. The memoir is constructed mostly of one-sentence paragraphs. At first I thought, "Oh. This is for our text-happy, tweeting population. All thoughts short,quick and free-floating." But there is much more going on here. The seemingly independent sentences are not random and DO form a cohesive whole. Chase is brilliant. So many thoughts, observations, feelings, happenings presented in a fresh, easily accessible style. Funny too.Several examples:(p.58) To a female passerby, a homeless man said, "You [...]


    2. I went to look at the sunset and was given a ticket for trespassing.I was unexpectedly surprised to find that this particular fractured figment, like a subtitled story about some anticipated, requisite sanity, instead became a ludicrous oxymoron, which became my favorite bit within the bigger book. But not to blame the balance of other mini-stories, which are all uniquely important to the timeline, in the life & thereto the (2014) book by Clifford Chase, The Tooth Fairy – Parents, Lovers, [...]


    3. A fine memoir that demonstrates the stealth emotional power of fragmentation. An obvious recent cousin (autobiographical fiction) is Jenny Offill's Dept. of Speculation (wonderful, wonderful). It is also a relative of Didion's Year of Magical Thinking, which, though not composed in teeny, subject-shuffling paragraphs, also uses emotional restraint to paradoxical effect. I had worried my brain would have to work hard (oh, poor me) to organize the narratives, but this was not the case. The Offill [...]


    4. Because I have known Cliff since high school I found the book fascinating. I remember his parents and found mutual friends appearing in the story of his life. In high school I thought I knew him well but there was a lot I didn't know going on beneath the surface. We lost touch for a few decades and this story filled me in on what I had missed. His sharing the story of the death of his brother Ken has given me some insights on what my husband may have gone through in dealing with the suicide of h [...]


    5. This unique memoir is composed of mainly one sentence thoughts, that taken as a whole, give a glimpse into a man who is dealing with his life as a gay man, the aging of his parents, and trying to make sense of his brothers death from AIDS. Some really good writing - I enjoyed it.



    6. When I started the book I thought I would hate it but actually it ended up being pretty interesting. The way it is written is very different.


    7. a well-thought out memoir. chase lets time guides him through many lessons so that what he writes is what he means. lovely, human, fair.


    Leave a Comment

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *