Interfictions: An Anthology of Interstitial Writing

Interfictions An Anthology of Interstitial Writing Nineteen writers dig into the imaginative spaces between conventional genres realistic and fantastical scholarly and poetic personal and political and bring up gems of new fiction interstitial ficti

  • Title: Interfictions: An Anthology of Interstitial Writing
  • Author: Delia Sherman Theodora Goss K. Tempest Bradford Karen Jordan Allen Rachel Pollack Veronica Schanoes Mikal Trimm Colin Greenland
  • ISBN: 9781931520249
  • Page: 275
  • Format: Paperback
  • Nineteen writers dig into the imaginative spaces between conventional genres realistic and fantastical, scholarly and poetic, personal and political and bring up gems of new fiction interstitial fiction.This is the literary mode of the new century, a reflection of the complex, ambiguous, and challenging world that we live in These nineteen stories, by some of the most inNineteen writers dig into the imaginative spaces between conventional genres realistic and fantastical, scholarly and poetic, personal and political and bring up gems of new fiction interstitial fiction.This is the literary mode of the new century, a reflection of the complex, ambiguous, and challenging world that we live in These nineteen stories, by some of the most interesting and innovative writers working today, will change your mind about what stories can and should do as they explore the imaginative space between conventional genres The editors garnered stories from new and established authors in the United States, Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom, and also fiction translated from Spanish, Hungarian, and French The collection features stories from Christopher Barzak, Colin Greenland, Holly Phillips, Rachel Pollack, Vandana Singh, Anna Tambour, Catherynne Valente, Leslie What, and others.

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      275 Delia Sherman Theodora Goss K. Tempest Bradford Karen Jordan Allen Rachel Pollack Veronica Schanoes Mikal Trimm Colin Greenland
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      Published :2019-08-09T02:31:59+00:00

    About "Delia Sherman Theodora Goss K. Tempest Bradford Karen Jordan Allen Rachel Pollack Veronica Schanoes Mikal Trimm Colin Greenland"

    1. Delia Sherman Theodora Goss K. Tempest Bradford Karen Jordan Allen Rachel Pollack Veronica Schanoes Mikal Trimm Colin Greenland

      Delia Sherman born 1951 is a fantasy writer and editor Her novel The Porcelain Dove won the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award She was born in Tokyo and brought up in New York City She earned a PhD in Renaissance studies at Brown University and taught at Boston and North eastern universities She is the author of the novels Through a Brazen Mirror, The Porcelain Dove a Mythopoeic Award winner , and Changeling Sherman co founded the Interstitial Arts Foundation, dedicated to promoting art that crosses genre borders.She lives in New York City with her wife and sometime collaborator, Ellen Kushner.

    847 thoughts on “Interfictions: An Anthology of Interstitial Writing”

    1. I enjoyed the tales in this anthology. I was especially impressed by the final story, Catherynne M. Valente's "A Dirge for Prester John" (in which the shipwrecked title character really does meet the creatures so fancifully described back in 1165 C.E.), as well as the entry from Anne Tambour ("The Shoe in SHOES' Window," a dispatch from a not-so-glorious but certainly resourceful Workers' Paradise) and Rachel Pollack's tale of the Old Testament prophet Joseph ("Burning Beard"), but they're fine [...]


    2. My utter favorite was Csilla Kleinheincz's "A Drop of Raspberry" because of the language (although it's a translation from the Hungarian) and imagery. "A Map of Everywhere" by Matthew Cheney also stood out in its quirkiness. Catherynne M. Valente's "A Dirge for Prester John" and Mikal Trimm's "Climbing Redemption Mountain" must also be mentioned. Overall, the anthology worked for me, as a collection of "interstitial" works. I attend science fiction conventions as well as the AWP, and have notice [...]


    3. What is interstitial fiction? This short story anthology does its best to find out. From the intro, which defines interstitial being between borders, but something that's not a hybrid, to each of the 19 stories crafted by some damn talented voices in fiction, I have to say, I learned a lot. Interstitial writing isn't just about genre, or only about genre. In some stories, interstitality had to do with place, or with character, or with a particular moment in life. This book is shelved in the SF/F [...]


    4. what a powerful collection! what i loved most about reading it was the reading experience itself: disorientation, surprise, anticipation, delay. these stories hit you, hard and ferocious; they linger. one thing i would have liked to see more of: engagement with / questioning of narrative convention and the written word itself. more breaking down of form, as in allen's piece; less single-voiced narrators, less confidence in stylistic unity. most memorable stories for me: barzak, singer, deluca, a [...]


    5. AMAZING. Seriously, this is probably the best collection of short stories I've read since Alice Walker's "in love and trouble". The concept of interstitial writing doesn't feel "new" as much as it is really about giving definition to what more and more writers are doing as they cross genres, defy "rules" of story telling and venture into to new territories. I love this book. love it. please read it.


    6. A star less than _Feeling Very Strange_, the first slipstream anthology I read. Same quasi-genre, same stories, different terminology. The cover blurb and the introduction are both VERY PRETENTIOUS (the Interstitial Arts Foundation? really? five'll get you ten all of these literary foundations are run out of someone's basement office) but if you can put aside the pretension the stories are for the most part pretty good.


    7. A collection of stories that don’t quite fall into any one genre. All well written, all pushing at the boundaries of fact and fiction, with the near constant theme that, no matter where the party is, Death fill find a way to crash it.


    8. These were mostly very interesting and good. I skimmed about 3, but eagerly devoured the rest, and thought Kafka would be proud.


    9. The stories in this book all fall between genres, satisfying anyone who can't decide on any one genre. Every story is well written and translated, with each story a different mix of characters that you get to know easily. My favorite story out of this book is, "A Drop Of Raspberry" translated from the original Hungarian. A lake takes on the form of a person when a man tries to drown himself in her after his divorce. The lake wakes up to him, and rescues him from drowning by washing him to the sh [...]


    10. While I'm still (after two readings) not sure I understand the introductory essay, I thoroughly enjoyed the stories. Several were lovely and weird and thought-provoking, which is just what I like in a story. Notable winners were Catherynne M. Valente's "A Dirge for Prester John", Vandana Singh's "Hunger", and Joy Marchand's "Pallas at Noon". Having said that, though, I just looked over the table of contents again and realized that most of the stories affected me in some way, so really the entire [...]


    11. There are some really good stories in here, but the context of the book is slightly amusing. There have always been plenty writers writing free of genre restrictions (Borges or Cervantes for instance), but they weren't necessarily part of a group. I have ambivalent feelings about this book trying to establish a genre of non-genre writing. But it's a good solid collection, although not the most adventurous.


    12. I wish I could do half-stars on here, but I couldn't see my way to rounding up to give this one four. There were quite a few gems in this collection which absolutely fulfills its purpose of exploring the space between conventional genres. And it had me right up until about the last third of the book. I simply got lost out in the interstices by then. It's quite possibly more my failure than that of the collection, but still.


    13. I have thus far disliked all but one of the stories I have read in this book. For instance I don't think the story "Timothy" deserves to see the light of day, let alone be included in an anthology of purportedly imaginative writing. Still, I'm keeping an open mind, since I have only read a handful of stories.


    14. I may have expected too much of this anthology. There were a few good stories here, but a lot more that I just ended up skimming. There is a fine line between surreality in fiction and a story that is just scattered.


    15. It's difficult to summarize or categorize this anthology, and I think that's one of the many things I enjoyed about it.


    16. I liked all the stories, though a few were confusing. I liked the variety of culture. My two favorites were "Black Feather" and "Rats" because I love fairy tales.


    17. I borrowed it to read "Rats," a short story by Veronica Schanoes, as she is one of my all-time favourite professors. Her story was disturbing and excellent!



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