Claxton: Field Notes from a Small Planet

Claxton Field Notes from a Small Planet Shortlisted for the Society of Biology Book Award After Mark Cocker s glorious book you will never look at a blackberry bush the same way again Philip Hoare New StatesmanIn a single twelve mont

  • Title: Claxton: Field Notes from a Small Planet
  • Author: Mark Cocker
  • ISBN: 9780224099653
  • Page: 304
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Shortlisted for the 2015 Society of Biology Book Award After Mark Cocker s glorious book, you will never look at a blackberry bush the same way again Philip Hoare, New StatesmanIn a single twelve month cycle of daily writings Mark Cocker explores his relationship to the East Anglian landscape, to nature and to all the living things around him The separate entries are chShortlisted for the 2015 Society of Biology Book Award After Mark Cocker s glorious book, you will never look at a blackberry bush the same way again Philip Hoare, New StatesmanIn a single twelve month cycle of daily writings Mark Cocker explores his relationship to the East Anglian landscape, to nature and to all the living things around him The separate entries are characterised by close observation, depth of experience, and a profound awareness of seasonal change, both within in each distinct year and, alarmingly, over the longer period, as a result of the changing climate The writing is concise, magical, inspiring.Cocker describes all the wildlife in the village not just birds, but plants, trees, mammals, hoverflies, moths, butterflies, bush crickets, grasshoppers, ants and bumblebees The book explores how these other species are as essential to our sense of genuine well being and to our feelings of rootedness as any other kind of fellowship.A celebration of the wonder that lies in our everyday experience, Cocker s book emphasises how Claxton is as much a state of mind as it is a place Above all else, it is a manifesto for the central importance of the local in all human activity.

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      Published :2019-01-19T08:47:16+00:00

    About "Mark Cocker"

    1. Mark Cocker

      Mark Cocker Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Claxton: Field Notes from a Small Planet book, this is one of the most wanted Mark Cocker author readers around the world.

    321 thoughts on “Claxton: Field Notes from a Small Planet”

    1. This is a collection of previously written articles that have been compiled into a book. Cocker has made it read like a diary with events and observations set over one year, thought they are from a number of different years, and he has also taken the liberty of polishing up some of the original text to help with the time and context. Most of the pieces are set local to him, hence the title of the book, and others from further afield, including Greece.In the same principle of the finest nature wr [...]


    2. (3.5) Mark Cocker is the Guardian’s country diarist for Norfolk. The short pieces in this book are reprints of his columns, some expanded or revised. Controversially, I started with the October chapter (the month it was when I picked up the book). This worked well in that I was able to notice the same trends Cocker was narrating. In fact, I would advise keeping this as a bedside or coffee table book from which you read no more than one or two entries a week, so that you always stay in chronolo [...]


    3. 4.5Claxton is a small village in Norfolk - a village lucky enough to have the wonderful and very gifted nature writer Mark Cocker living in it.The book describes a 12 month cycle of diary writings, although there aren't entries for every day, and it covers several years within that cycle. Most of the entries are about local observations in and around Claxton although occasionally he goes much further afield.I have seen Cocker on several TV programmes and he is an eloquent speaker. However, the q [...]


    4. In Mark Cocker’s new book, we see a return to his roots - the chronicling of life in a small and apparently unremarkable piece of countryside.The short essays in ‘Claxton’ were originally written for a variety of publications, notably ‘The Guardian’. Of these pieces, 140 have been assembled here (and some rewritten) to present a natural diary of the author’s home village and its surroundings.These essays are not confined exclusively to the ‘home patch’. Here the net of experience [...]


    5. This book comprises 140 short essays, originally published as newspaper articles, each describing one or more aspects of the wildlife (and some tame) observed by the author on a stated day of the year, over a period of about 10 years. Most arise from observations in his chosen home parish in Norfolk, with some from elsewhere in the UK, and a few overseas. Each essay is a short and relaxed read - each deserves to be savoured: I read them two or three at a sitting; some might prefer to take a year [...]


    6. A beautiful book about Claxton in Norfolk -wildlife, nature. Follows Claxton through the calendar. Jumps about a bit between years which I was not so keen on. On a par with Meadowland although I preferred Meadowland.


    7. In this book, Mark Cocker collects together a year of writings on the subject of the nature around him. I believe the collection was first published as nature notes in a national newspaper. The information largely relates to his local parish of Claxton but there are isolated notes concerning places that he visits. I found the text really interesting and loved hearing the details of the plants and animals. The aim of the text is partly to inform, partly to argue the case of us refreshing the bond [...]


    8. Difficult to star-rate a book like this in comparison with most of the other stuff I read, and I've had so little time or energy for reading lately anyway it's taken me ages. However--it's a lovely collection of short pieces over a calendar year of dates (though not all the same year), recording encounters with the natural world, mostly, but not all, in the East Anglian landscape. Interesting, informative, and often soothing (though sometimes shocking or saddening). Made me wish I could go and w [...]


    9. The specific detail and general restriction to a small area are important. The seasonality is well conveyed by the ordering of the articles by date, not year. I like the patience and concentration that comes across and the respect for words and the idea of connection between the moment of writing and the moment of reading. There is also a sense of the connectedness of creatures, plants, climate and people. As a result of the pieces being originally written for the press and for a deadline, there [...]


    10. Reading anything by Mark Cocker is guaranteed to hold my attention, to fill my heart.For me this book's weakness is also its strength. At the beginning I struggled with the fact that this book wasn't written as one whole cohesive piece, but instead fragments written over a number of years, and then grouped according to month. At times I felt frustrated that each piece was so short, I was barely warmed to the subject before it was finished.But then I started to feel something special about the wa [...]


    11. A wonderful, lyrical elegy to nature, this is a beautifully written and minutely observed book. It is a also a book that is tinged with melancholy due to the destructive swathe that we have been cutting through the English countryside over recent decades.


    12. This collection stems from the nature diaries found in the Guardian and the EDP newspapers and I think that's where its strength lies. I've always found those little articles of four hundred words or so to be a perfect slice of nature writing, a little window which keeps you in tune with the rhythms of the seasons even if, like me, you are destined to live an urban life. The diary entries Claxton read wonderfully well, the prose is lyrically written but founded on the knowledge of an excellent n [...]


    13. Mark Cocker ranks alongside Richard Mabey and Robert Macfarlane as one of my favourite writers about the natural world. Claxton pulls together writings about his small village in the Yare valley in Norfolk (with an occasional scattering of passages from other locations), originally published in other magazines and newspapers. It is presented here in diary form, so I chose to read the book over the whole of the last year, reading each short chapter on the day it describes. Like Cocker's brilliant [...]


    14. At one stage there were thousands, we were teeming with them. Now, with careful help they are making a comeback, but it is patchy across the country. Naturalists. In this case, Cocker has been taken, with his family of course, out to rural Norfolk in an effort to repopulate that region. He is forced to go out, seemingly on most days of the year, and report on what he has seen. Otters, falcons, moths, grasshoppers - the usual malarkey. His usual tale is you used to have this near you, but now it [...]



    15. Brilliant. Mark Cocker, a naturalist and writer about nature, follows a year around Claxton, his home village, in East Anglia. The writing was drawn from his observations over twelve years.


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