The Year's Best Military SF & Space Opera

The Year s Best Military SF Space Opera With an introduction by best selling military science fiction author David Drake and selected by editor David Afsharirad from the top short story markets in the field here are the most thrilling pul

  • Title: The Year's Best Military SF & Space Opera
  • Author: David Afsharirad
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 159
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • With an introduction by best selling military science fiction author David Drake and selected by editor David Afsharirad from the top short story markets in the field, here are the most thrilling, pulse pounding, and thought provoking stories of the past year Stories of future military men and women, space opera on a grand scale, and edge of your seat adventure tales in tWith an introduction by best selling military science fiction author David Drake and selected by editor David Afsharirad from the top short story markets in the field, here are the most thrilling, pulse pounding, and thought provoking stories of the past year Stories of future military men and women, space opera on a grand scale, and edge of your seat adventure tales in the pulp tradition, from giants of the genre to brilliant up and comers.Plus, you be the judge INTERACTIVE READER VOTING One story from this collection will be chosen via proctored on line voting as Year s Best Military SF and Space Opera, with the award to be presented at DragonCon in September 2015t the publisher s request, this title is sold without DRM Digital Rights Management.About The Year s Best Military SF and Space Opera This intriguing anthology explores the human race s violent potential but also bends toward exploration and the triumph of the human spirit, with brave tales that take the reader on a fascinating, thought provoking, enjoyable journey Publishers Weekly starred review Contributors Brad R TorgersenMichael Z WilliamsonCharlie Jane AndersLinda NagataSeth DickinsonWilliam LedbetterEric Leif DavinDavid D LevineStephen GaskellMichael BarrettaDerek KunskenHolly BlackRobert R ChaseMatthew JohnsonEditor David Afsharirad lives in Austin, Texas He is a graduate of the University of Texas at Dallas and North Carolina State University, where he earned an MFA in creative writing A life long reader and writer of short fiction, his stories have appeared in various magazines and journals He is also an editor of the online lit magazine PINBALL.

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      Published :2019-08-13T16:16:34+00:00

    About "David Afsharirad"

    1. David Afsharirad

      David Afsharirad Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Year's Best Military SF & Space Opera book, this is one of the most wanted David Afsharirad author readers around the world.

    534 thoughts on “The Year's Best Military SF & Space Opera”


    1. A high quality anthology with one especially exceptional space opera story, "Persephone Descending" by Derek Künsken, which got my vote for for the contest. Künsken imagined a harsh and dangerous Venus on the frontiers of human civilization that is teeming with vivid and alien life as a woman tries to survive the people and planet trying to kill her. Completely awesome."Soft Casualty" by Michael Z. Williamson is probably the runner-up for me, with his blend of mil-sci-fi and horror.Linda Nagat [...]


    2. Sometime in early 2015 I read David Levine's the End of the Silk Road. It was a good story but what really caught my attention was how a very modern story was located in the Venus of old SF - the Venus made famous by Edgar Rice Burroughs. I thought I have to read more such stories, but it wasn't a subgenre I was too keen on - the fact it took the world over 4 decades to create something that can stand next to Tarkovsky's Solaris (not counting Scott's Alien) had turned me off the genre. Then, ear [...]


    3. Borrowed from the library. Great, well-balanced collection with a few stories worth revisiting (and some new (to me) authors to pursue).


    4. Of the several short stories in here I really liked about half of them. Linda Nagata's Codename: Delphi and Light and Shadow were both really good and seemed to take place in the same universe. Seth Dickinson's Morrigan In The Sunglare was another contender for my favorite, as was Rule of Engagement by Matthew Johnson. Michael Z. Williamson's Soft Casualty succeeded in being psychologically horrifying. While Ten Rule For Being an Intergalactic Smuggler By Holly Black was every kids dream after s [...]


    5. I had thought of 5 out of 5 but looking back on the book you have to realize some were good, and some were meh. For the most part the Military SF ones were well done and some needed some work, like the last entry on "I-Wars" and what that all meant, as well as the crumbling of the USA and so on. I think with more of an explanation on How Things Came To Be then maybe I would have followed the story better, rather than try and piece together what the author was trying to convey. I picked that part [...]


    6. This is a superb anthology. The stories range from very hard, technological military sci-fi (the opening Codename: Delphi by Linda Nagata, to the classic space operas Persephone Descending by Derek Künsken and my favorite in the collection, The Rules for Being an Intergalactic Smuggler (the Successful Kind by Holly Black--which I want much more of, by the way. There's even a wonderfully crafted noir detective thriller set in the mid-1930s a 1930s wherein Earth already has colonies on Mars and V [...]


    7. I got hold of this via Baen's Monthly ebook bundle deal and listened to The Baen Free Radio podcast on the book. A collection of the so-called "best" is always tricky, because tastes vary from person to person and the stories are both SF military or space opera. I enjoyed the book, some stories more than others. The one I voted for (on the Baen's website) was "Ten Rules for Being an Intergalactic Smuggler" by Holly Black. I liked most of the other tales, but that was the one I enjoyed most. Read [...]


    8. This is by far the best short fiction anthology of 2014.David Afsharirad is here to a good start, outshining the established classics (Dozois, Strahan, etc).Okay, there are only 15 stories, making this also the shortest anthology, and of these only 3 standouts (the Black, the Levine, and the Anders), but except two naive barely-SF military stories, the remaining 10 are above average and worth the read.Will definitely continue following this series.


    9. Short stories, ranging from "meh" to well-written and thought-provoking. Most of these weren't much to write home about, but I really enjoyed two stories by Linda Nagata (whose other work I'll have to investigate), William Ledbetter's utterly charming "Stealing Arturo", and my personal favorite, about a geo-engineer turned vigilante hell-bent on revenge, Charlie Jane Anders.


    10. Not my usual genre, but it's good to step out of the old comfort zone once in awhile.My favorites were "Light and Shadow" by Linda Nagata and "Ten Rules for Being an Intergalactic Smuggler (The Successful Kind)" by Holly Black.I liked the ones with elements of noir, but the more tech-heavy ones weren't my style, but then again, this is outside of my usual genre. A pretty decent collection.


    11. My favorites were Code Name: Delphi (Nagata), Light and Shadow (Nagata), Soft Casualty (Williamson), Stealing Arturo (Ledbetter), Rules of Engagement (Johnson), Rules for Being an Intergalactic Smuggler (Black), and War Dog (Barretta).


    12. As with most anthologies, I liked sone of the stories more than others. The stories did, with a couple exceptions, tend to be a bit dark. It was all in all a good read if you enjoy the genre like I do.


    13. Some really awesome stories -- and I was pleasantly surprised to find that there were quite a few stories with women in good roles.






    14. Not a bad book, but as other reviewers have said, some of the stories are not as good as others. Not sure what one I liked the best but a couple I had read before on the Baen website.



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