No More Champagne: Churchill and His Money

No More Champagne Churchill and His Money The untold story of Winston Churchill s precarious finances and the most original and surprising book about Churchill to emerge for many years The popular image of Churchill grandson of a duke drinki

  • Title: No More Champagne: Churchill and His Money
  • Author: David Lough
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 109
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • The untold story of Winston Churchill s precarious finances and the most original and surprising book about Churchill to emerge for many years The popular image of Churchill grandson of a duke, drinking champagne and smoking a cigar conjures up a man of wealth and substance The reality is that Britain s most celebrated 20th century statesman lived for most of his lThe untold story of Winston Churchill s precarious finances and the most original and surprising book about Churchill to emerge for many years The popular image of Churchill grandson of a duke, drinking champagne and smoking a cigar conjures up a man of wealth and substance The reality is that Britain s most celebrated 20th century statesman lived for most of his life on a financial cliff edge Only fragments of information about his finances, or their impact on his public life, have previously emerged With the help of unprecedented access to Churchill s private records, David Lough creates the first fully researched narrative of Churchill s private finances and business affairs As he reveals the scale of Churchill s financial risk taking, combined with an ability to talk or write himself out of the tightest of corners, the links between the private man and public figure become clear.

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      Published :2019-05-18T00:27:16+00:00

    About "David Lough"

    1. David Lough

      David Lough Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the No More Champagne: Churchill and His Money book, this is one of the most wanted David Lough author readers around the world.

    754 thoughts on “No More Champagne: Churchill and His Money”

    1. Is it possible for a book to be tedious and interesting at the same time? That's my reaction to No More Champagne.Tedious, in that the author goes into Winston Churchill's finances in excruciating detail. There doesn't seem to be a single receipt or bank statement in Churchill's entire life that the author doesn't examine and analyze for us. And he takes great pains to be impassive and factual -- which is always difficult in a non-textbook.But interesting, because it is so intriguing to see how [...]


    2. If you believe like I do that it was Churchill who saved civilization, and if you are Iike me and have read numerous biographies and autobiographies of him, nothing can quite prepare you for the fresh look this book offers of him. Born to a certain level of privilege, it never seemed to occur to him that living below his means might take some pressure off. He spent (no pun intended) his entire adult life at the edge of economic disaster. He spent every nickel he ever made and had to depend on th [...]


    3. Using a thorough review of the family accounts, Lough reconstructs a mind-boggling lifetime of utter financial lunacy. Although technically provided for from the waning Marlborough fortunes, Churchill's father and mother were capable of immense self-delusion and shell game financial behavior, which Churchill embraced starting as a child. For the rest of his life, he would frantically write himself out of bankruptcy corners, get wealthy friends to bail him out, and shift assets around while relyi [...]


    4. Lough does an outstanding job using Churchill's letters, bills, and other writings to reveal the recklessness with which he conducted his financial affairs and how money worries dominated his thinking throughout his life. The Churchill texts are supported by letters from collaborators, creditors, financiers, publishers, family members, and others that make crystal clear the precariousness of Churchill's financial position.An engrossing read that reveals much about the character of one of the 20t [...]


    5. An eye-opening account of Winston Churchill's finances; it accomplishes the strange task of being mind numbingly boring and utterly shocking and infuriating all at the same time. I started it off with a bang but ultimately became bogged down in the excruciating detail of Winnie's stocks, trusts, gambling, racehorses, not to mention his distaste for paying tax on his very substantial income (!). After I struggled to the end, I've come to the conclusion that it was a fascinating topic made much le [...]


    6. It's difficult for a biographer to find an "in" or a "niche" to write a biography around. Particularly a biography of Winston Churchill, who not only was the subject of many books, but who also wrote numerous autobiographies and memoirs. There's not much left for a new biographer to cover but British author David Lough finds one in his new biography, "No More Champagne: Churchill and His Money". Lough comes at his subject not as an historian, but rather after a long career as a private banker. H [...]


    7. A tale of how easy it was for a man with a reputation and an inheritance held in trust to bully the banks and even the Inland Revenue. Something of an asymmetric account, because you never got a terribly good idea of what the people who bailed Churchill out expected to get for it; maybe it is long enough ago that the feeling of having helped out the great politician of the age was reward enough, but I would have liked to see the figures for equivalent deals with other people so you knew whether [...]


    8. David Lough uses his background in the financial world to sketch a fascinating portrait of one of the few remaining areas of Churchill's life that have avoided in-depth treatment. In a life as varied as Churchill's, one of the few constants was his love of luxury and addiction to debt, borrowing and gambling (in both stocks and casinos). The bailouts required of wealthy benefactors, the poor financial decisions and squandered windfalls, is a side of the great statesman that has not previously re [...]


    9. This book appeals to a specific audience that's either 1) interested in finance, or 2) interested in Churchill. If you're a more general historian, it would likely come off quite dry, but being a member of both the finance and Churchill fan clubs, I found this fascinating, as it adds a huge amount of depth to the Churchill story, and David Lough has done painstaking research to put this together.


    10. One of the funniest biographies I've ever read, even if the author showed great restraint in how he presented the Churchill family at their most feckless. The story of Chartwell's renovation was especially amusing.



    11. Not an historian myself, I found this a fascinating read - and found it extraordinary that such a revealing aspect of Churchill's character had not been properly researched before. Lough, being a trained historian, as well as having had a career in financial management, is able to offer a wonderfully assured explanation of both the complex financial instruments involved and the political and historical context, and does so with admirable lucidity. He also resists the temptation to make moral jud [...]


    12. Lough stoically ploughed through, and made sense of, the financial records of Churchill. It's a dry read, (I read the hardback version) but he has done a good job of making it readable. And what emerges is fascinating. The man was chronically unable to live within his considerable means. He gambled compulsively and lived the lifestyle he believed he was entitled to, despite always being in deep debt. His literary work, assisted by a team of barely acknowledged co-writers, was to pay the bills. R [...]


    13. Finance, balanced/unbalanced budgets how can that be exciting and worth anyone's time? Trust me, it is. Because of the most fascinating real person in British HistoryMr. Winston Churchill. The writer does a most in-depth job of following his young full of privilege life, as he grows into adult hood and beyond. The struggles and definitive moments he took to sustain that life sometimes to his and his families detriment, when of course using today's thinking to scale back would have been so much e [...]


    14. A Fresh AngleI've read dozens of books either by or about Sir Winston, so it's rare to find anything new or original. Lough's book manages to be exactly that. Other biographies have spent some time on Churchill's struggles with money, but this is by far the most comprehensive account that I've ever read. Of particular interest to me was the story of his long battle against Britain's Inland Revenue, a valiant fight for individual liberty that ought to resonate with all taxpayers.


    15. This is a great fresh look at one of the greatest men in modern history. It raises a very basic question: Should poor personal finances disqualify someone for public service or public office. Judging by Churchill, the answer is no.On another note, I hate debt, so this book gave me continuous agita. I was constantly screaming at him, "No, don't gamble that money!!! No, don't buy more stuff!! No! No! No! Pay off your debts first."


    16. An eye-opening book based on Churchill's bank records and other financial documents Churchill was a gargantuan spendthrift often deep in debt and a risk-taking gambler, both at the casino and on the stock markets his accounts didn't cross over into the black until World War II fascinating in its detail


    17. Yet another side to the complicated Mr Churchill. A great compliment to "Clementine," which I read a couple months ago. Churchill's prodigious authorial output is only of interest in this book as it relates to his income and (over-)expenditures. There's another book out there on Churchill as author that I still want to track down before I move on from my Churchill-mania.




    18. A different kind of book about Churchill. The author links his political career with his money problems and seemingly there were plenty of them!!! A great book




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