The Price of Prosperity: Why Rich Nations Fail and How to Renew Them

The Price of Prosperity Why Rich Nations Fail and How to Renew Them In this bold history and manifesto a former White House director of economic policy under President George H W Bush explores exposes the economic political and cultural cracks that wealthy nations

  • Title: The Price of Prosperity: Why Rich Nations Fail and How to Renew Them
  • Author: Todd G. Buchholz
  • ISBN: 9780062405708
  • Page: 195
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In this bold history and manifesto, a former White House director of economic policy under President George H W Bush explores exposes the economic, political, and cultural cracks that wealthy nations face and makes the case for transforming those same vulnerabilities into sources of strength and the foundation of a national renewal.America and other developed countries,In this bold history and manifesto, a former White House director of economic policy under President George H W Bush explores exposes the economic, political, and cultural cracks that wealthy nations face and makes the case for transforming those same vulnerabilities into sources of strength and the foundation of a national renewal.America and other developed countries, including Germany, Japan, France, and Great Britain are in desperate straits The loss of community, a contracting jobs market, immigration fears, rising globalization, and poisonous partisanship the adverse price of unprecedented prosperity are pushing these nations to the brink Acclaimed author, economist, hedge fund manager, and presidential advisor Todd G Buchholz argues that without a sense of common purpose and shared identity, nations can collapse The signs are everywhere Reckless financial markets encourage people to gamble with other people s money A coddling educational culture removes the stigma of underachievement Community traditions such as American Legion cookouts and patriotic parades are derided as corny or jingoistic Newcomers are watched with suspicion and contempt As Buchholz makes clear, the United States is not the first country to suffer these fissures In The Price of Prosperity he examines the fates of previous empires those that have fallen as well as those extricated from near collapse and the ruins of war thanks to the vision and efforts of strong leaders He then identifies what great leaders do to fend off the forces that tear nations apart Is the loss of empire inevitable No Can a community spirit be restored in the U.S and in Europe The answer is a resounding yes We cannot retrieve the jobs of our grandparents, but we can embrace uniquely American traditions, while building new foundations for growth and change Buchholz offers a roadmap to recovery, and calls for a revival of national pride and patriotism to help us come together once again to protect the nation and ensure our future.

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      195 Todd G. Buchholz
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      Posted by:Todd G. Buchholz
      Published :2019-08-24T02:00:09+00:00

    About "Todd G. Buchholz"

    1. Todd G. Buchholz

      A well known American economist and a former senior economic advisor at the White House, Buchholz holds advanced degrees from Cambridge University and Harvard, where he won the Allyn Young Teaching Prize Buchholz is known for being on the short list for Federal Reserve considerations in 2006 He frequently writes for newspapers such as The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, in addition to appearing as a commentator on NBC, CNBC, Fox News, and PBS His books have been translated into over 15 languages.Buchholz resides primarily in San Diego, California, but travels around the world speaking to various companies, including Microsoft and Citibank, about the worldwide economic issues Buchholz is involved in several business, real estate, and design companies, including Wetamorph and the Two Oceans Fund He is one of the founding producers of Jersey Boys.

    254 thoughts on “The Price of Prosperity: Why Rich Nations Fail and How to Renew Them”

    1. An excellent book distilling the problem of rich countries into simple acts: 1) as countries get richer, fertility rate drops; 2) immigrants are needed to do jobs that the local bred won't do; 3A) society gets fragmented as it gets more diverse or 3B) society cease to exist as its population shrinks. The clarity of this book makes it easy to understand recent trends in all the prosperous countries. The second part is mainly about historical heroes who manages to handle these problems. I'm going [...]


    2. I read this book to better understand how "others" think but found myself gasping at the ignorance and belittling of the work ethic of the poor and young. I did not see one mention of the nonworking wealthy and privileged living off of capital gains tax cuts. "A shattering of work ethic and of ambition shows up even in high school course selections, as native-born students display less ambition and avoid more difficult classes. Even though employers are handing out bonuses for graduates in scien [...]



    3. Disappointing.The author's main point is that a collection of five disparate problems (population decline, globalization, debt, work, and immigration) have beset many successful polities in the past, usually right before their downfall. He has, unsurprisingly, a conservative perspective, but there is merit in what he says. Indeed, much of it is fact.Unfortunately, he fails to unite these points into any sort of coherent thesis, and doesn't offer any groundbreaking solutions. Indeed the subtitle [...]


    4. I couldn't finish this as the guy is obviously a conservative economist with an agenda.I was not buying into some of his conclusions. I don't know where his data came from as I was listening to this book and could not see if there were any footnotes. But I don't think they would have changed my mind as he was not very objective.



    5. I just finished the book this Sunday morning. Todd Buchholz starts by a common saying in the US that people would move to Canada if one's best candidate doesn't get elected. He mentioned that this time might be different by analyzing the rise and falls of great nations in the past.


    6. Full disclosure, I received a Galley copy thru though I was excited to have won a copy as Mr. Buchholz's prior work New Ideas from Dead Economists was one of my favorite primers on the great economic thinkers through history and their current relevance. This book was a departure but a welcome one. It had a similar structure and feel to Glenn Hubbard and Tim Kane's Balance in that it identified a substantial weakness in US governance and political priorities while providing some interesting hist [...]


    7. This book is ideal for history buffs. Extremely carefully written and meticulously researched, every point that Buchholz makes is supported directly by historical examples. Overall, his thesis is supported by the given evidence. However, despite being a great piece of persuasive writing, readers can still make independent conclusions. Thus, Buchholz's conclusions are sufficient to explain the given evidence, but are not necessary (allowing for distinct conclusions by readers).Structurally, the b [...]


    8. While having some interesting ideas and keeping the content interesting with modern cultural references, my biggest complaint in this book is that it seems very anecdotal. The book provides repeated historical examples, but each one has the caveat – “this is not the only factor”. Though still illustrative and showing a pattern, it would have been nice to see additional statistical analysis of his examples to show more conclusive theses.That being said, I think this book provides some inter [...]


    9. I thought this book would be a more detailed look into the current situation in the US. It was part economics, part history but much of the historical component in Part II is focused on individual leaders from the past and how the uniquely served their countries/empires. I found it a bit much and frankly thought the stories to be way too long and sometimes off topic. Seemed like it took forever to get to the point. In terms of trying to prove out his thesis, felt like the author could have eithe [...]


    10. I would give Part I 5*. It was a very interesting and entertaining presentation of the author's reasons why rich nations fail over time. Part II receives 4*. I learned many new things about famous leaders such as Alexander the Great, Ataturk, and Golda Meier, as well as the Meiji Revolution in Japan. Part III was very disappointing---2* at best. It was a relatively short laundry list of ideas to foster national unity and avoid societal breakdowns. The three parts of this book were not very well [...]


    11. It's been a very long time since I struggled so much while reading a book. The messages included here are nuanced and provocative, and really get you thinking. I do not agree with the underlying assumption that the nation is a holy thing that must be maintained. Even without that assumption though there's enough to wrestle with. Just make sure you're aware that this is an economic historian. The reverence for history can be a bit much sometimes :)


    12. I won this book through . This is not a normal read for me. Too deep. This book was really very thoughtful and interesting. Very enjoyable and not hard to read at all.


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