Black Panther Epic Collection: Panther's Rage

Black Panther Epic Collection Panther s Rage In the s Stan Lee and Jack Kirby created an unprecedented string of classic comic book heroes One of them was the high tech king of Wakanda The Black Panther When the Panther began his own solo

  • Title: Black Panther Epic Collection: Panther's Rage
  • Author: Don McGregor Marvel Comics Stan Lee Jack Kirby Rich Buckler Klaus Janson BillyGraham Bob McLeod
  • ISBN: 9781302901905
  • Page: 482
  • Format: Paperback
  • In the 1960s, Stan Lee and Jack Kirby created an unprecedented string of classic comic book heroes One of them was the high tech king of Wakanda, The Black Panther When the Panther began his own solo series, Don McGregor strove to meet Lee and Kirby s high standard with Panther s Rage It was an epic adventure so huge it ranged across the savannah, into the deepest junIn the 1960s, Stan Lee and Jack Kirby created an unprecedented string of classic comic book heroes One of them was the high tech king of Wakanda, The Black Panther When the Panther began his own solo series, Don McGregor strove to meet Lee and Kirby s high standard with Panther s Rage It was an epic adventure so huge it ranged across the savannah, into the deepest jungles and up snow topped mountains Over its course, McGregor would explore and expand the life and culture of Wakanda and their African kingdom in compelling detailLLECTING VOL 1 FANTASTIC FOUR 1961 52 53, JUNGLE ACTION 1972 6 24

    • Best Read [Don McGregor Marvel Comics Stan Lee Jack Kirby Rich Buckler Klaus Janson BillyGraham Bob McLeod] Õ Black Panther Epic Collection: Panther's Rage || [Biography Book] PDF ↠
      482 Don McGregor Marvel Comics Stan Lee Jack Kirby Rich Buckler Klaus Janson BillyGraham Bob McLeod
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Don McGregor Marvel Comics Stan Lee Jack Kirby Rich Buckler Klaus Janson BillyGraham Bob McLeod] Õ Black Panther Epic Collection: Panther's Rage || [Biography Book] PDF ↠
      Posted by:Don McGregor Marvel Comics Stan Lee Jack Kirby Rich Buckler Klaus Janson BillyGraham Bob McLeod
      Published :2019-02-07T01:17:48+00:00

    About "Don McGregor Marvel Comics Stan Lee Jack Kirby Rich Buckler Klaus Janson BillyGraham Bob McLeod"

    1. Don McGregor Marvel Comics Stan Lee Jack Kirby Rich Buckler Klaus Janson BillyGraham Bob McLeod

      Don McGregor Marvel Comics Stan Lee Jack Kirby Rich Buckler Klaus Janson BillyGraham Bob McLeod Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Black Panther Epic Collection: Panther's Rage book, this is one of the most wanted Don McGregor Marvel Comics Stan Lee Jack Kirby Rich Buckler Klaus Janson BillyGraham Bob McLeod author readers around the world.

    300 thoughts on “Black Panther Epic Collection: Panther's Rage”

    1. "For 13 bimonthly issues, over the course of nearly three years (yeah, I know. Let's just say that Marvel wasn't exactly a stickler for shipping dates, back in the seventies), aided and abetted by a number of artists, including the late, great Billy Graham, "The Panther's Rage" was everything a super-hero comic should be. This overlooked and underrated classic is arguably the most tightly-written multi-part superhero epic ever. If you can get your hands on it (and where's that trade paperback co [...]


    2. "Too many people warp the word heritage, Monica . . . they use it to mean superiority when it is only meant to give one identity." - T'Challa, the Black Panther, to Monica Lynne. This is an impressive volume! Strong binding, great color reproduction, and a classic story, of course. The story still holds up well, and it's kind of amazing that Marvel published this in the early to mid-seventies. Marvel experimented then, tried new, more mature formats, like their B&W magazines, but a monthly s [...]


    3. Touted as the first true graphic novel, this collection shows the 70s era Black Panther at hisbest, though it was a little disappointing that the Ku Klux Klan story didn't really have a conclusion, nor did the murder case T'Challa was investigating, but I guess that's what happens when a comic gets cancelled.


    4. These Epic Collections have been very well designed, with good maps of the characters' adventures, and so this first Black Panther volume begins with the Panther's first appearance in Fantastic Four #52-53. Mind you, the story isn't that great; it begins with a typical superheroes-fight encounter and is filled with horrible dialogue and disbelievable plot points. But it also features the Panther's origin, with Klaw and his mercs, and that's very nicely presented."Panther's Rage" (BP #6-18) fills [...]


    5. This was an interesting collection of 21 early Black panther comics. Starting out with the extremely camp Fantastic Four story that introduced Black Panther to the Marvel universe. The stories then get progressively better as they go along.The first introduction of Black Panther made me cringe and laugh at the same time. Fantastic Four are just so daggy and so very dated now! They are cliched and stilted. Basically they get an invite from an mysterious stranger. This turns out to be a trap set b [...]


    6. Black Panther is an idealist. He will always have an enemy in that things are rarely ideal. T'Challa's is a constant struggle for perfection, knowing full well he will always fall short. You can't please everybody, as Erik Killmonger would tell you. He is reality incarnate, challenging his king's ambition, and casting doubt over his existence. The outcome, as Don McGregor will never let me forget, is inevitable: Panther's rage is his triumph.Revolutionizing (Marvel) comics forever with this firs [...]


    7. Far from my favorite run of Black Panther, I know that without McGregor, this titular Marvel hero's mythos would be far from what Christopher Priest revolutionized in the 90s. Although Kirby and Lee created Black Panther, McGregor had a major hand developing Erik Killmonger and Wakanda from beyond their initial appearances in other Marvel publications. Despite my reverence for the history on this volume, as well as its often stellar artwork, Panther's Rage first half suffers from a combination o [...]


    8. As a kid I remember going to the local convenience store after school and picking issues of Black Panther off the spinner rack. From what I remember these issues seemed very different from the other Marvel comics I've been reading at the time. Black Panther read like an epic long tale with very well developed characters. T'Challa, the king and ruler of the technologically advanced country of Wakanda is tested in both mind and body as he struggles to lead and hold together the people of his count [...]



    9. For readers hungry for more Black Panther after seeing the outstanding Marvel Studios movie, "Panther's Rage" is a good place to start. In addition to collecting Don McGregor's two important long form storylines, "Panther's Rage" and "The Panther vs. The Klan," first published in the Seventies "Jungle Action" comic, it also reprints T'Challa's first appearance in Fantastic Four from 1966.Don McGregor is the first writer to substantially explore T'Challa's land of Wakanda and unapologetically inj [...]


    10. This collection was problematic for me. On the one hand, it is a precursor to modern comic book storytelling. It is a long form adventure where every issue holds a self contained adventure that nonetheless advances a larger plot. Furthermore, it is a comic with a heroic black protagonist and many positive black supporting characters, both male & female. On the other hand, the book is just filled with ignorance and stereotypes.I remember when the comics contained in this collection first appe [...]


    11. Some of the earliest Black Panther stories, including his first appearance in Fantastic Four. Panther's Rage is an excellent story that dives into Wakanda giving the country its own identity. Many concepts introduced in this book, including the story's main villain, Erik Killmonger, continue to be referenced today. In addition to some great stories, the art is very well done, with some creative use of perspective that helps make the story pop. Another storyline features Black Panther returning t [...]


    12. I'm not a big Silver Age fan, or hugely into 1970s Marvel comics, but this is one of the best I've read. The Stan Lee Fantastic Four issues that start the collection are some of his better work, but the Don McGregor issues from Jungle Action read like some of the better 1980s superhero epics. I had never heard of this run until a former coworker recommended it today, and I'm glad I picked it up. There's a cool story about how Wakanda reacted when T'Challa left to be an Avenger that is considered [...]


    13. I’ve wanted to read McGregor’s legendary Black Panther run for years now, and I am so glad I did in preparation for seeing Marvel’s Black Panther film. There is much from this collection that influences the movie, but that’s not the only reason to read this. McGregor leads Marvel Comics’ first extended exploration of Wakanda here and does a fantastic job detailing that universe’s most advanced country. The mix of tech and tradition, political intrigue and old fashioned jungle action [...]


    14. Excellent book! The art is beautifully presented. The story is well-written. I loved how the Black Panther deals with a lot of social injustices. It is an excellent way to shed light on injustices without confrontation.


    15. It's ok. Very overly wordy. Verbose to the max. Looks good for 1970s art but most the villains look corny. It's a good long interesting early look at TChalla and the lands and people of Wakanda, which is why I bought it.




    Leave a Comment

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *