Cruising the Library: Perversities in the Organization of Knowledge

Cruising the Library Perversities in the Organization of Knowledge Cruising the Library offers a highly innovative analysis of the history of sexuality and categories of sexual perversion through a critical examination of the Library of Congress and its cataloging pr

  • Title: Cruising the Library: Perversities in the Organization of Knowledge
  • Author: Melissa Adler
  • ISBN: 9780823276356
  • Page: 115
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Cruising the Library offers a highly innovative analysis of the history of sexuality and categories of sexual perversion through a critical examination of the Library of Congress and its cataloging practices Taking the publication of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick s Epistemologies of the Closet as emblematic of the Library s inability to account for sexual difference, Melissa AdleCruising the Library offers a highly innovative analysis of the history of sexuality and categories of sexual perversion through a critical examination of the Library of Congress and its cataloging practices Taking the publication of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick s Epistemologies of the Closet as emblematic of the Library s inability to account for sexual difference, Melissa Adler embarks upon a detailed critique of how cataloging systems have delimited and proscribed expressions of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and race in a manner that mirrors psychiatric and sociological attempts to pathologize non normative sexual practices and civil subjects.Taking up a parallel analysis, Adler utilizes Roderick A Ferguson s Aberrations in Black as another example of how the Library of Congress fails to account for, and thereby buries, difference She examines the physical space of the Library as one that encourages forms of governmentality as theorized by Michel Foucault while also allowing for its utopian possibilities Finally, she offers a brief but highly illuminating history of the Delta Collection Likely established before the turn of the twentieth century and active until its gradual dissolution in the 1960s, the Delta Collection was a secret archive within the Library of Congress that housed materials confiscated by the United States Post Office and other federal agencies These were materials deemed too obscene for public dissemination or general access Adler reveals how the Delta Collection was used to regulate difference and squelch dissent in the McCarthy era while also linking it to evolving understandings of so called perversion in the scientific study of sexual difference.Sophisticated, engrossing, and highly readable, Cruising the Library provides us with a critical understanding of library science, an alternative view of discourses around the history of sexuality, and an analysis of the relationship between governmentality and the cataloging of research and information as well as categories of difference in American culture.

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      Published :2019-02-05T12:02:13+00:00

    About "Melissa Adler"

    1. Melissa Adler

      Melissa Adler Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Cruising the Library: Perversities in the Organization of Knowledge book, this is one of the most wanted Melissa Adler author readers around the world.

    199 thoughts on “Cruising the Library: Perversities in the Organization of Knowledge”

    1. Taking a Foucauldian approach, this book explores how the supposedly 'neutral' Library of Congress classification system serves to discipline and police categories of knowledge, especially - though not only - knowledge of sex, sexuality and the 'perverse' or 'obscene'. Adler analyses in detail how the system and processes that underpin libraries and librarianship take on an ideological role in terms of how books and the knowledge they contain are classified, hierarchised, collocated and, sometim [...]


    2. I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley.I want to preface this review by saying I was interested for the organization of knowledge rather than LQBTQ specifics. I am not at all familiar with that literature so this was a bit more challenging for me than the average reader of this book. Prof Adler writes a wonderfully compelling story and history of classification in the library especially the Library of Congress Classification system and how it shapes and segregates our reading and ser [...]


    3. Cruising the Library by Melissa Adler is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in late February.This book examines the sections between HQ76 and HQ71 in the area of Social Sciences at the Library of Congress - books that have been sorted out and archived as perverse or obscene, and really separated into the topics of Paraphilias, Fetish (mostly feet), Neuroses, psychosexual disorders, and sexual deviation. Fear and hysteria have ruled this collection and led for curators to dispose and even burn ce [...]


    4. When I was of college age in the early 1970s, a friend was taking a class called 'Deviant Behavior.' It explored various groups from homosexuals to the Gray Panthers. I asked her who defined the norm? She looked at me as if I had two heads, and she never really understood the question.In my asking, though, I had unwittingly placed my finger on the difficulty. If you have the power to define what is 'normal,' you have the power to label anything else as deviant. The Library of Congress took it on [...]


    5. A fascinating study of cataloguing bias against LGBTQ items and patrons that for its heavily academic approach, relying a lot on Foucault, is a surprisingly easy read (although, as one reviewer pointed out - it would've helped significantly to be a little familiar with Foucault and/or Sedgwick). This book builds upon Adler's fascinating body of work quite well, and a must for anyone that is interested in the intersection between LGBTQ and Library and Information Studies. It also makes me want to [...]


    6. I previewed this book as an e-book from NetGalley.This niche academic work on cataloging and the history of sexuality was super interesting. I think it's probably a little hard to decipher if you do not have a background in libraries, philosophy, and gender studies but if you stick with it I found the questions raised and information discovered to be well worth the effort.




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