The Winged Girl Of Knossos

The Winged Girl Of Knossos Inas leaps at adventure She dives to the bottom of the Aegean Sea to harvest sponges and somersaults over charging bulls in front of thousands of people Best of all she soars from cliffs wearing the

  • Title: The Winged Girl Of Knossos
  • Author: Erick Berry
  • ISBN: 9789997489203
  • Page: 319
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Inas leaps at adventure She dives to the bottom of the Aegean Sea to harvest sponges and somersaults over charging bulls in front of thousands of people Best of all, she soars from cliffs wearing the glider wings her father builds in secret, safe from the prying eyes of their neighbors, who think flying is sorcery.When Princess Ariadne seeks Inas s help to hatch a plan wInas leaps at adventure She dives to the bottom of the Aegean Sea to harvest sponges and somersaults over charging bulls in front of thousands of people Best of all, she soars from cliffs wearing the glider wings her father builds in secret, safe from the prying eyes of their neighbors, who think flying is sorcery.When Princess Ariadne seeks Inas s help to hatch a plan with Theseus, a young Greek who s held prisoner in the palace s Labyrinth, Inas doesn t realize how much adventure she is taking on In fact, Inas suddenly finds that she may be about to lose everything she holds dear on the island of Crete.A fun, fast paced retelling of the Greek myths of Icarus and Theseus, this 1934 Newbery Honor book was ahead of its time and is sure to find lots of fans among today s readers When push comes to shove, Katniss Everdeen has nothing on Inas, daughter of Daidalos Betsy Bird I ngenious reimagining of the myths of Theseus and Icarus with a bold, clever girl in the starring role Brimming with adventure and historical detail The Wall Street Journal Let s re establish this book back where it truly belongs In the canon as a classic of its time School Library Journal in its column Recommendation from Under the Radar Hair raising moments aplenty move this story along Gobs of rich detail about the Minoan world are woven in as wellI love when these excellent, long forgotten Newbery Honor books become available This would make a dandy choice for voracious readers ages 9 and up Orange Marmalade Books In the wonderfully energetic Inas, Berry has created a heroine for the ages, one of the first and most memorable self determining girls in the Newbery canona rediscovery that no fan of children s historical fiction, myth inspired adventure stories, or Newbery award books should miss The Emerald City Book ReviewErick Berry was the pen name of Allena Champlin 1892 1974 , an award winning author and illustrator She was born in New Bedford, Massachusetts, studied art in Paris, and spent time in Africa She wrote nonfiction about life in Africa as well as historical fiction She was married to author Herbert Best and illustrated many of his books in addition to her own.Betsy Bird is Evanston Public Library s Collection Development Manager She has served on the Newbery Award committee and written for The Horn Book Currently, she runs the blog A Fuse 8 Production on the School Library Journal website.

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      319 Erick Berry
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      Posted by:Erick Berry
      Published :2019-05-03T07:38:02+00:00

    About "Erick Berry"

    1. Erick Berry

      A pseudonym of Allena Best.

    117 thoughts on “The Winged Girl Of Knossos”

    1. On the one hand, it is awesome to see a novel from the 1930s featuring a brave, active, adventurous girl heroine. Inas dives for sponges, takes part in the bull-tossing ceremony, and test-flies her father Daedalous' artificial wings. She is smart, sometimes, about practical matters like seeing when her father is heading into a clash with the local priest and needs to move his experiment to a more hidden location.On the other hand, I wasn't all that fond of Inas herself. Her adventurous ways are [...]


    2. I'll tell you truly, I can't actually review this because I wrote the Appreciation in the back of this magnificent 2017 reprint. What I can say is that for 15 years I've been waiting for this Newbery Honor winner to come back into print. Now it has and I couldn't be more pleased. Hooray!


    3. Lovely adventure story. Before Katniss, there was Inas, a young Cretan woman, the privileged daughter of a famous engineer. Inas dives wish the fishing boats for sponges, is a champion bull-vaulter, she flies and/or glides on large wings that she and her father have designed and built. Ina's is simultaneously rescued by and rescues her love more like they work together for their own survival. This story is imaginative and wonderful.Badass book, published in 1933. By Erick Berry, pseudonym for Al [...]


    4. See my full review at The Emerald City Book Review. Ever since Betsy Bird put this long-lost Newbery honor book from 1934 at the top of her list of underrated middle grade books I've been dying to read it. And lo and behold, sometimes dreams do come true! Three years later, it's back in print thanks to the fantastic folks at Paul Dry Books, with an afterword by Betsy herself.Set in ancient Crete, The Winged Girl of Knossos starts out with a thrilling scene in which our heroine, Inas, goes deep s [...]


    5. I thought that it was a fun book. Not too accurate, but they use some good famous names and stories which developed into legends, like Diadalos and his labyrinth, Ariadne's string to help find a way out of the labyrinth, King Minos, etc. Not quite sure if Crete is where the legends started either, but I guess it is possible, except King Minos was the king of Crete. That is known.Oh, and the Basque people are not runaway Cretans like the afterword in the book suggests. That theory never gained cr [...]


    6. I read this because I was looking for a new diverse book for my 4th graders who study ancient Greece, and I studied Minoan archaeology in my undergrad and grad days (I have an MA in pre-historic archaeology). Within the first chapter I knew it wouldn't work because of both the impressive vocabulary required ('plaudits' is rarely even seen in middle school vocab books these days), and the fact that the main character is marked as extraordinary because she is blonde. While this was considered fine [...]


    7. A neat re-telling (sort of) of the Theseus and Ariadne myth, through the eyes of Daidalos' daughter. The writing isn't earth-shattering or anything, but it's a fun story nonetheless.


    8. Interesting to see how radically different the Newbery Award winning book from 1934 is presented, compared to contemporary award-winning books. (Though there's always a special place in my heart for this mythology-type-stuff.)


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