Planet India: How the Fastest Growing Democracy Is Transforming America and the World

Planet India How the Fastest Growing Democracy Is Transforming America and the World India is everywhere on magazine covers and cinema marquees at the gym and in the kitchen in corporate boardrooms and on Capitol Hill Through incisive reportage and illuminating analysis Mira Kamdar

  • Title: Planet India: How the Fastest Growing Democracy Is Transforming America and the World
  • Author: Mira Kamdar
  • ISBN: 9780743296854
  • Page: 182
  • Format: Hardcover
  • India is everywhere on magazine covers and cinema marquees, at the gym and in the kitchen, in corporate boardrooms and on Capitol Hill Through incisive reportage and illuminating analysis, Mira Kamdar explores India s astonishing transformation from a developing country into a global powerhouse She takes us inside India, reporting on the people, companies, and policiesIndia is everywhere on magazine covers and cinema marquees, at the gym and in the kitchen, in corporate boardrooms and on Capitol Hill Through incisive reportage and illuminating analysis, Mira Kamdar explores India s astonishing transformation from a developing country into a global powerhouse She takes us inside India, reporting on the people, companies, and policies defining the new India and revealing how it will profoundly affect our future financially, culturally, politically.The world s fastest growing democracy, India has the youngest population on the planet, and a middle class as big as the population of the entire United States Its market has the potential to become the world s largest As one film producer told Kamdar when they met in New York, Who needs the American audience There are only 300 million people here Not only is India the ideal market for the next new thing, but with a highly skilled English speaking workforce, elite educational institutions, and growing foreign investment, India is emerging as an innovator of the technology that is driving the next phase of the global economy.While India is celebrating its meteoric rise, it is also racing against time to bring the benefits of the twenty first century to the 800 million Indians who live on less than two dollars per day, to find the sustainable energy to fuel its explosive economic growth, and to navigate international and domestic politics to ensure India s security and its status as a global power India is the world in microcosm the challenges it faces are universal from combating terrorism, poverty, and disease to protecting the environment and creating jobs The urgency of these challenges for India is spurring innovative solutions, which will catapult it to the top of the new world order If India succeeds, it will not only save itself, it will save us all If it fails, we will all suffer As goes India, so goes the world.Mira Kamdar tells the dramatic story of a nation in the midst of redefining itself and our world Provocative, timely, and essential, Planet India is the groundbreaking book that will convince Americans just how high the stakes are what there is to lose, and what there is to gain from India s meteoric rise.DID YOU KNOW India is the world s fourth largest economy By 2034, India will be the most populous country on Earth, with 1.6 billion people India s middle class is already larger than the entire population of the United States One out of three of the world s malnourished children live in India India is home to the biggest youth population on earth 600 million people are under the age of 25 72,000,000 cell phones will be sold in India in 2007 India just edged past the United States to become the second most preferred destination for foreign direct investment after China In 1991, Indians purchased 150,000 automobiles in 2007, they are expected to purchase 10 million By 2008, India s total pool of qualified graduates will be than twice as large as China s By 2015, an estimated 3.5 million white collar U.S jobs will be offshored India is the largest arms importer in the developing world American corporations expect to earn 20 to 40 billion from the civilian nuclear agreement with India In 2007, there are 2.2 million Indian Americans, a number expected to double every decade Twenty nine percent of India s population speaks English that s 350 million people.

    • Best Download [Mira Kamdar] ¿ Planet India: How the Fastest Growing Democracy Is Transforming America and the World || [Religion Book] PDF ↠
      182 Mira Kamdar
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    About "Mira Kamdar"

    1. Mira Kamdar

      Born to a Gujarati father raised in Burma and India and a Danish American mother raised on a farm in Oregon, Mira Kamdar has navigated between different localities and identities her whole life As a four year old, she asked her mother Which way am I half Up and down Or sideways She is still trying to find the answer to this question.Educated at Reed College, the Johns Hopkins University, and the University of California at Berkeley, Mira Kamdar studied philosophy with Jacques Derrida, Jean Francois Lyotard and Michel Foucault and wrote a doctoral dissertation on the politics of mimesis in Diderot under the direction of Philippe Lacoue Labarthe Unhappy teaching in America s hinterland, she made her way to New York in the late 1980s where she began writing on current affairs and joined the World Policy Institute.Mira Kamdar s first book was a critically acclaimed memoir, Motiba s Tattoos A Granddaughter s Journey from America into her Indian Family s Past Public Affairs 2000 Plume 2001 It was a 2000 Barnes Noble Discover Great New Writers Selection and won the 2002 Washington Book Award.Her latest book is Planet India The Turbulent Rise of the World s Largest Democracy and the Future of our World Scribner 2008 The book has been translated and published in over a dozen foreign editions, including Hindi, Chinese, Arabic, Dutch, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish and French.Mira Kamdar s work has appeared in publications around the world, including Slate, The Washington Post, The Times of India, Daily News Analysis, Outlook, The International Herald Tribune, The Los Angeles Times, The Chicago Tribune, World Policy Journal, Tehelka, Seminar, the Far Eastern Economic Review and YaleGlobal She writes on issues that concern her deeply globalization, climate change, agriculture and the food crisis, sustainability, consumption, violence, India, France and the United States.Perfectly bilingual in French, she provides expert commentary to CNN International, Bloomberg TV, the BBC, MTV Iggy, National Public Radio, TV Ontario, Public Radio International, Radio France, TV 5 Monde and FR 3 A contributing editor to The Caravan magazine and a member of the editorial board of World Policy Journal, she writes the Mot de l Inde column for Courrier International and blogs for Le Monde Diplomatique s Plan te Asie and the Huffington Post.In 2010 2011, Mira Kamdar will be affiliated with the CEIAS Centre des Etudes de l Inde et l Asie du Sud at the EHESS Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales as a Fulbright Senior Scholar under the auspice of the Franco American Commission for a project on Enlightenment images of India as they contributed to the construction of European identity.Mira Kamdar is a Senior Fellow at the World Policy Institute and an Associate Fellow at Asia Society in New York She is a regular speaker on India and international affairs for university, business and community audiences and, circling back to her days as a budding academic, is teaching again in Montreal, New York and France Her ambition is to continue to make a living as an essayist at large in the world, to bring philosophy back into her life and work, and to play jazz violin as brilliantly as Stephane Grappelli She lives in Paris.

    500 thoughts on “Planet India: How the Fastest Growing Democracy Is Transforming America and the World”

    1. yayavartours/uploads/1 تساهم شبه القارة الهندية في تكوين نسمة الكرة الأرضية بأكثر من مليار شخص وبسبب هذا العدد الهائل من الارواح فيها نجدهم في كل المجالات المتوفرة في العالم سواءً الجيدة أو السيئة فهم منتشرون في كل مكان وبالتأكيد هم يأثرون ويمسون حياة باقي البلدان لهذا يجب علينا ان لا [...]


    2. This book enumerated on India's current and growing role as an economic powerhouse, and as an important player in international security. However, the book did not do enough to elucidate India's cultural influence. In fact, the author spent more time explaining how America shapes India. It is a good read for a bit of trivia, but the book does nothing to shatter paradigms, and it certainly is not life changing.


    3. Ugh, this book was so boring; it took me forever to finish it. The genre of contemporary issues/political science/news articles-in-book format tends not to produce a lot of page-turners, but this one was particularly bad. It's another of those books (of which I have read many) that attempts to capture a picture of 'modern India', good and bad; Planet India leans very heavily to the 'good' side, probably due to the research all having taken place in 2005-6, pre-Global Recession. On the one hand, [...]


    4. I learned so much about India and U.S./Indian relations in this fascinating book. The author conducted hundreds of interviews all over India and gives anecdotal evidence to support her empirical claims about India's future.


    5. This was the August book club book for my office book club. It started out interesting, then just started repeating itself. When I found out I had a scheduling conflict with the book club meeting, I decided not to finish this book. The concept was good, I think it could be more succinct.


    6. I'm really happy about this book so far. It's a survey of modern India and its indicativeness (not a word, I know) of global change, much of it positive.


    7. Dense and very well researched. Although a little dry in places, it's a fascinating study of what many Americans don't realize will soon be the most populous country in the world. Incredibly helpful in my world-building research for The Lady & The Spyder series (as Korin I. Dushayl).



    8. With every Desi writer and their brother writing a tome about India’s short and long term fate with the conclusions ranging from over the top optimistic to absolutely dire, the average reader (Desi and otherwise) must view the slew of books on this subject with some consternation not to mention confusion. All opinions, conjectures and projections are not equal and certainly not everyone has the same qualifications to be dispensing the wisdom, foresight and commentary on the future and fortunes [...]


    9. It seems that no matter how old, big, diverse or culturally rich a country is, it is still susceptible to Western influence (or contamination). India may soon surpass China as the most populous country in the world and is also developing quickly from a third world country, with which come all the challenges (problems) that have been plaguing the US and others already. Environmental problems such as pollution and lack of water, economic, health and social problems. Some see India as the test case [...]


    10. I really liked this book because it gave me the other side of my home country. It showed me the different unseen issues and dealings of India. I never thought that India had that much information to show to people while speaking economically and politically. India has potential within its people except there are always obstacles for people to express their best. The deficiency of a good running system in the market and government doesn’t do any good in improving India. The talking of making th [...]


    11. This is the first book in a long, long time that I quit reading. I got about halfway through, and I just couldn't do it anymore.I know, understand, and agree that India is an important part of our global community. I get that it is important to understand a culture that is such an important player in the world today. But Mira Kamdar's book was written like an impossibly long article.The introduction held all of the points that were to be discussed throughout the book, and they were concise. Mean [...]


    12. All things IndiaPlanet India provides the reader with a vast array of knowledge and information about the emerging powerhouse country of Asia, and it's expanding recognition in all global areas.Mira Kamdar satisfies the readers with a passion for India, while at the same time providing much research and an informed knowledge base to placate all serious students and readers on this topic. As a strong, populous democracy with many serious challenges before it India is revealed through various topi [...]


    13. I really liked this book. Its is written from an southeast asian-centric view point and talks in depth about many economic and global realities that someone who is looking for a casual read about India might find daunting.It has an interesting section towards the beginning of the book that talks about the media industry and bollywood, interesting timing considering the way that "Slumdog Millionaire" is sweeping the awards ceremonies for film right now.Parts of it shocked me and some of it made m [...]


    14. Overall, a good read and a decent overview of India's burgeoning status as a world power. However, if you are fairly in the know about India, much of the information is not especially new. Also, towards the end of the book, the reading became a little rushed through, as if Mira Kamdar was trying to meet her deadline. (I found it particularly odd that in the last paragraphs, as she's closing the book about India, she goes into a little blurb about the U.S.-China relations, which was very random.) [...]


    15. Half of this book tells us what most people already know, or at the very least suspect: India, with vast amounts of human and financial capital, is and will be a major factor in the global economic and cultural scene (I don't need 150 pages of information to understand that the 2nd most populous country on earth is significant.) The other half indicts the social systems that the capitalism glorified in the first half enables. Kamdar is sympathetic, but she seems woefully naive about the root cau [...]


    16. There's a whole slew of books out now with a similar message: watch out american worker! Indians are smart, plentiful and willing to work for less. You're screwed! I work with a lot of people from India. The ones I know are smart, great people. They don't want to live on dirt piles any more than I do. I suspect that as India becomes more affluent, the bargains will dry up. There will be more competition, but there will also be more to do. Somehow I don't feel all that threatened. Maybe I'm naive [...]


    17. Even though it is a few years old, I've wanted to read this book for a while and am so glad I did. It was a great modern perspective of India from a woman who was born to an Indian father and an American moma few years older than me. Kamdar is a media correspondent on India and writes objectively on the subject but you can feel her connection to the country in a way that many of us native and first generation Indians do. I found this book to be very informative and made me very proud of the prog [...]


    18. Reading the book it really makes you feel india is on another plante. Grasping the enourmousness of the country, coming from a 2-million population is a challange on his own. There you can really understand what economies of scale mean.And the country apparently has a strategy. Unbelivable!And doing good by doing well is it's moto. I cannot believe I knew so little about india before I read this. If one is interested in the world of tommorrow you definately need to read this.


    19. Mira explores 21st century India - a country of many contradictions: India is a country undergoing rapid development as the premier destination for software and business process outsourcing, yet at the same time, it is grappling with a host of issues - poverty, poor infrastructure, and social and religious tensions. The book does a great job of showing both the optimism that the country feels and the challenges that it faces.


    20. Have you ever read an article on the Internet that felt like it went on and on and on and no matter how far you scroll down, there is no end in sight?That is this book.I tend to agree with the premise, which is that we need to look to India as a burgeoning economy with real impact on American life, but everything needed for that is laid out in the introduction. Everything after that is just extra. And that's not necessarily a good thing.


    21. I had a hard time getting into this book, and actually was unable to finish it completely by the time it was due back to the library. I didn't like it enough to renew for two more weeks. This book would be good for the hard core non-fiction readers who like textbook-like reading. Personally, I had enough of that in college so it just wasn't for me.


    22. I have been curious to know more about contemporary India, and stumbled upon this book after hearing the author give a fascinating lecture. Planet India is very readable as well as informative as the author is quite knowledgeable about the political, social, and economic aspects of this country that will become more important in the coming years.


    23. Interesting perspective on modern India, and as an expatriate in Bangalore, I got a better understanding of what was going on around me. I wish it were better written. The first time I saw the word "wholistic", I thought it was a clever, intentional pun, but after the gazillionth time, I realized that neither the author nor her editors could be bothered to use Spell-Check.


    24. Interesting beginning, focusing on bollywood and the entertainment industry. I come away sensing the dynamic problem of the philosophies Ghandi vs. Technology, the hunger of Captalism vs. the hunger of the poor. I feel she really puts me in the mind, and perhaps, hearts of the elite in India, but not of the poor, those who the system seems to work against.


    25. It start out praising everything about India - it is the best of Asia. Reading it I kept thinking, what about the gap between rich and poor? Environmental issues? Impact of caste? But the last half focuses on all of this. I think it is written more for the Indian diaspora than for the general public in that it mentions many Indian names unfamiliar to the general public. Interesting.


    26. Written in 2007, this book is about the rise of India to become one of the major powers of the world. India has been developing rapidly, but faces problems of extreme inequality as well as serious problems concerning energy, education, health care, disease, and global warming.If India is able to work toward solving these problems, it will be important for the whole planet.


    27. A great up-to-date source for information on India. Tons of statistics and quotes from a myriad of sources. A surprising amount of information on the entertainment industry. Overall, a balanced view of modern India.


    28. It's written like an overly slick government-sponsored pamphlet on the importance of India. Either that or an overly extended crappy Newsweek article. Dropping names on every page, just seems to show how biased this book is - I'm never reading another Mira Kamdar book again. Waste of time.


    29. Extremely optimistic -- so much so that it stretches credibility a lot. The warts in this capitalist love story are given a look-over, a band-aid slapped on, and Kamdar moves on. Pretty well-written though, if you like that sort of thing.


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